drama

Cast announced for Beneath An Irish Sky

We are pleased to announce our cast for this dramatic reading of Kieran Kelly’s new play.

This March as part of our season of events to commemorate the 1916 Rising we will be holding a dramatic reading of a new play by local author and historian Kieran Kelly. Beneath an Irish Sky looks at the events of 1916 from a Donegal perspective. It is a fictionalised account of one man’s journey through those those turbulent times, questioning what made him pick up a gun to fight for his country and how one moment in his youth affected the rest of his life.

CAST
Jack Quinn (Brendan McDaid)
Patrick McBrearty (Francis Doherty)
Charlie Bonner (Patrick McDaid)
Orla Carlin (Mary McDaid )
Hugh Carr (Michael McDaid)
Tomás Barriscale (Young Brendan)
Michael Leddy (Fr John McCafferty)
Jason Daly (Dr JP Mc Ginley)

Charlie Bonner in the Lyric Theatre 2015 production of Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel

Charlie Bonner in the Lyric Theatre 2015 production of Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel

A professional actor with 25 years experience, Charlie Bonner most recently appeared at An Grianán in the acclaimed Livin’ Dred production The Kings of the Kilburn High Road and in last year’s Lyric Theatre production of the Brian Friel classic Dancing at Lughnasa.

Patrick McBrearty in An Grianan Theatre's Frank Pig Says Hello touring Ireland Sept to Oct 2014. Photo by Paul McGuckin. All rights reserved.

Patrick McBrearty in An Grianan Theatre’s Frank Pig Says Hello,  Irish Tour Ireland Sept to Oct 2014. Photo by Paul McGuckin. All rights reserved.

From St Johnson, Patrick McBrearty made his professional debut in our production of Frank Pig Says Hello also with director David Grant. He is currently appearing in Sole Purpose’s Blinkered and will soon appear in Belfast Tempest, a huge Shakespearean production which will feature a cast of 200 performers.

Jack Quinn as Fr Jack in An Grianán Productions' Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel, Oct/Nov 2002. Photo: Declan Doherty

Jack Quinn as Fr Jack in An Grianán Productions’ Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel, Oct/Nov 2002. Photo: Declan Doherty

Jack Quinn has had a long and varied career and has appeared many times in An Grianán productions including our very first touring show, Brian Friel’s Translations in 1999. He also appeared in our Irish Times Theatre award winning production  of Dancing at Lughnasa in 2002.

Orla Carlin (right) in Fiesta, July 2014. Photo by Declan Doherty.

Orla Carlin (right) in Fiesta, July 2014. Photo by Declan Doherty.

Orla Carlin’s previous roles with An Grianán include Fiesta, Brian Friel’s Aristocrats. She has also performed with the Letterkenny Pantomime Society and in the Letterkenny Music & Drama Group’s Don’t Tell the Wife.

Cast members Martin McGinley, Michael Leddy, Valerie Bryce and Eoghan MacGiolla Bhride.

Michael Leddy (second from left) in Bread and Roses Theatre’s Can’t Pay, Won’t Pay, July 2015. Photo by Rik Walton.

Originally from Leitrim but now based in Letterkenny, Michael Leddy’s recent acting roles include Puddle Alley’s Bookworms and last year’s Earagail Arts Festival hit Can’t Pay, Won’t Pay!

Jason Daly in Fiesta, July 2014. Photo by Declan Doherty.

Jason Daly in Fiesta, July 2014. Photo by Declan Doherty.

Jason Daly appeared in our production of The Freedom on the City in 2013 before going to Dublin to study at the Lir Academy of Performing Arts. He also had one of the principal roles in our original production of Fiesta in 2014.

Hugh Carr and Tomás Barriscale are both graduates of our Youth Theatre programme. Tomás is currently studying science in Cork while Hugh is getting ready for his Leaving Cert and planning to study theatre and acting at college.

A Terrible Beauty: Remembering 1916

Tues 22 March at 8pm
Beneath An Irish Sky – rehearsed reading
Tickets: €5 Book now

Wed 23 March at 8pm
The Rising
Tickets: €15/€12 Book now

Fri 1 April
Left Behind: The Widows of 1916
Tickets: €15/€12 Book now

This performance supported by Donegal County Council and the Ireland 1916 Cetenary programme.

This performance supported by Donegal County Council and the Ireland 1916 Centenary programme.

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Little John Nee Can Pick Them! by Daithí Ramsay

I was sitting in the theatre cafe one lunchtime enjoying the lovely food and chatting away to Little John Nee, who had popped in to eat as he often does when he’s in town, and he asked what shows we had coming up. I reeled off the list of upcoming Drama and John nodded along ‘good, good, that’s a fine show, good, good jeez it’s a fine season you have there’* Then I got to Fishamble and Pat Kinevane’s Silent and John became visibly animated, ‘That’s one of the best theatre shows ever, everyone should go see that’.

Now one of the things I believe about selling a show is you can sell anything if you’re passionate enough about it. We all can get carried away by other people’s passions from time to time, I remember standing in the queue at Milford Garda Station chatting to a fella who was passionate about vintage tractors and it rubbed off on me so much that for a week or two so was I. So I knew that when it came to writing about the show in our new magazine, An Grianán Extra, rather than me, who hasn’t seen it, taking up all the words I’d be a sight better off getting John to, and he was good enough to do just that, so here’s what he wrote:

‘I am delighted to be asked to tell you about Pat Kinevane’s “Silent” for I can say with certainty that if you go to see the show on the basis of my recommendation you will be eternally grateful to me. To put it very simply Pat Kinevane is one of my favourite writers and performers on the whole planet, I come away from his shows simultaneously entertained, inspired and humbled and the world is always a richer place as I travel home; only great theatre can do that; it’s rare don’t miss it!’

And so what’s the point of this post when the show hasn’t been on yet and I haven’t seen it yet either? Well this week it was nominated for an Olivier Award! the British Theatre Oscars as it’s often referred to, a rare honour for an Irish play. It qualifies because of its run in London last year. So, you know, if Little John Nee tells you a horse is a good horse, I’d suggest putting a few bob on it …

So, what you now should do is book to see Silent when it’s here at An Grianán Theatre on Thursday 28th April, here’s the link to book too Silent By Pat Kinevane booking link

silen.fishamble.17Apr13-600x600

*my apologies to John for any liberties taken in my representation of him chatting, I’m claiming artistic licence!

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The Birthday Party’s Declan Rodgers

Actor Declan Rodgers speaks about appearing in London Classic Theatre’s The Birthday Party which comes to An Grianán this May.

A native of Dundrum, Co Down, Declan trained at LAMDA. His TV and film appearances include Holby City, In Cold Blood, Ashes to Ashes and Six Degrees. Theatre includes: I’m With The Band (Traverse Theatre & UK Tour), Can’t Forget About You (Lyric Theatre), Shoot The Crow (Trafalgar Studios), Carousel (Bush), Service (Nilon Productions/Theatre 503), Hope Dies Last (Arcola Theatre) and City (Encounter Productions).

Can you tell us what The Birthday Party is all about and how your character fits in?

The play is set in the living room of a seaside boardinghouse during the 1950s. The play centres around Stanley Webber, a 30 something retired piano player who is living at the boardinghouse with its elderly owners. One day, two mysterious men with unclear but certainly harmful intentions arrive and insist upon a birthday party for Stanley. His life is destroyed in the process.

I play McCann – One of the “mysterious men” that arrive at the boardinghouse.

Declan Rodgers in The Birthday Party. Photo by Sheila Burnett.

Declan Rodgers in The Birthday Party. Photo by Sheila Burnett.

The production is touring to thirty seven venues around the UK and Ireland – what’s it like doing such a long run? How do productions tend to change over that amount of time?

I find long runs very fulfilling, as I am always discovering new things about my character with each performance. Longer runs allow me to enrich the character further and build upon relationships that my character has within the world of the play.

How important is touring theatre?

I believe that touring theatre is very important, especially at the moment. With funding cuts being widespread across the regions, local theatres have come to rely on touring companies, such as London Classic Theatre, to produce quality shows, both in new writing and classics such as The Birthday Party by Pinter.

Do you have any advice for young people thinking about pursuing acting as a career?

I would say that you really have to go to drama school. Your graduating shows are a shop window for you to display your talent to the prospective agents in the market for new graduates. The best school in my opinion is LAMDA, but then I’m biased!

The Birthday Party
Thursday 26 May 2016 at 8pm
Tickets: €20/€18 Book now

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Beneath An Irish Sky: Letterkenny and 1916

A Terrible Beauty: Remembering 1916 is our short season of events inspired by the 1916 Easter Rising. We’ll have three shows, the first of which is a rehearsed reading of a new play by local writer Kieran Kelly.

Kieran Kelly with his book Letterkenny Where The Winding Swilly Flows

Kieran Kelly with his book Letterkenny Where The Winding Swilly Flows

Kieran Kelly will be well known to An Grianán regulars as he has performed many times on our stage in productions as diverse as A Midsummer’s Night Dream, The 39 Steps and Sister Act to name just a few. As a author he has written a book on the history of Letterkenny and a children’s play, Echoes of Time, commissioned by An Grianán to celebrate Letterkenny’s 400th anniversary.

Inspired by archive reports and eye witness testimonies, his new play Beneath An Irish Sky looks at the events of 1916 from a Donegal perspective. It is a fictionalised account of one man’s journey through those those turbulent times, questioning what made him pick up a gun to fight for his country and how one moment in his youth affected the rest of his life.

The Pulpit of the Four Masters in St. Eunan’s Cathedral, Letterkenny. Patrick and Willie Pearse both helped with the design and sculpting of this while working in their father’s business in 1900

The Pulpit of the Four Masters in St. Eunan’s Cathedral, Letterkenny. Patrick and Willie Pearse both helped with the design and sculpting of this while working in their father’s business in 1900

“Beneath an Irish Sky is my tale of a character from Letterkenny, Brendan McDaid, as he recalls years later how he moved from the peaceful Nationalism of the Ancient Order of Hibernians into the more militant Republicanism of Sinn Féin as a direct consequence of the 1916 Rising.” explains Kieran. “This life altering decision will have far reaching implications for both himself and his family. Based on research from eyewitness testimonies and archive newspaper reports, Letterkenny between 1914 and 1921 serves as the backdrop to his journey.”

This dramatic reading will be directed by David Grant and will feature a cast of 8 actors. David Grant has enjoyed a varied career in theatre throughout Ireland as director, critic and teacher. He has been Managing Editor of Theatre Ireland magazine, Programme Director of the Dublin Theatre Festival and Artistic Director of the Lyric Theatre, Belfast and has directed more than a hundred theatre productions ranging from Shakespeare to new and devised work. He currently lectures in drama at Queen’s University, Belfast. He has directed several productions for An Grianán: Frank Pig Says Hello (2014), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2008) and Thomas Kilroy’s The O’Neill (2007).

The British troops departing Letterkenny in 1922 following the War of Independence

British troops departing Letterkenny in 1922 following the War of Independence

Letterkenny has a few historic connections to the Rising – the Pulpit of the Four Masters in St. Eunan’s Cathedral was designed and sculpted by the family of Patrick Pearse, and Joseph Sweeney, who fought at the GPO, attended St. Eunan’s College.

A Terrible Beauty: Remembering 1916

Tues 22 March at 8pm
Beneath An Irish Sky – rehearsed reading
Tickets: €5 Book now

Wed 23 March at 8pm
The Rising
Tickets: €15/€12 Book now

Fri 1 April
Left Behind: The Widows of 1916
Tickets: €15/€12 Book now

This performance supported by Donegal County Council and the Ireland 1916 Cetenary programme.

This performance supported by Donegal County Council and the Ireland 1916 Centenary programme.

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A Terrible Beauty: Remembering 1916

A Terrible Beauty: Remembering 1916 is our short season of events marking the centenary of the Easter Rising.

We have three shows which will look at 1916 from three different perspectives. We have a dramatic reading of Kieran Kelly’s new play Beneath An Irish Sky which looks at the impact that the Rising had on Donegal. Then we have two Letterkenny performers, John D Ruddy and Brian Gillespie, starring in The Rising, a fast paced and entertaining show which looks at the events that led to 1916 including the first World War. Finally we have Left Behind,  a music concert from Michelle O’Rourke and composer Simon O’Connor which is inspired by some of the women involved in the Rising.

The British troops departing Letterkenny in 1922 following the War of Independence

British troops departing Letterkenny in 1922 following the War of Independence

Beneath An Irish Sky, Tues 22 March 2016 at 8pm Tickets: €5

How did the events of Easter week 1916 affect the people of Letterkenny and Donegal? Based on archive reports and eye witness testimonies, Beneath an Irish Sky is a fictionalised account of one man’s journey through those those turbulent times, questioning what made him pick up a gun to fight for his country and how one moment in his youth affected the rest of his life.

Written by local author and historian Kieran Kelly, Beneath An Irish Sky will be presented as a rehearsed reading featuring a cast of eight actors directed  by David Grant (Frank Pig Says Hello, A Midsummer Night’s Dream). Find out more.

Ireland 1916 2016 The Rising  with John Ruddy and Brian Gillespie March 2016 Easter

The Rising: John D Ruddy reprises his role alongside new cast member Brian Gillespie (not pictured).

The Rising, Wed 23 March 2016 at 8pm. Tickets: €15/€12

Touring nationally to great acclaim, this production features two local performers –  John D Ruddy is a Letterkenny based actor whose recent roles include Fiesta, The 39 Steps and I Would Walk These Fields Again. A native of Letterkenny, Brian Gillespie now lives in London where he is the artistic director of B-Hybrid Dance.

Described by the Irish Times, as “90 minutes of exhilarating and terrifying factual theatre”, The Rising relives the tumultuous days of the 1916 Rising through the eyes of two friendly adversaries, O’Brien, a Catholic, and Mc Keague, a Protestant. Over an action packed performance O’Brien and McKeague will tell the story of this pivotal event in Irish history in vaudeville style, with humour, song and dance, as they re-enact the Rising and the events that led to it, including World War 1. Find out more.

Simon O'Connor and Michelle O'Rourke - Left Behind: songs of the widows of 1916. An Grianan Letterkenny April 2016

Composer Simon O’Connor and vocalist Michelle O’Rourke present Left Behind: Songs of the 1916 Widows. 1 April 2016.

Left Behind: Songs of the 1916 Widows, Friday 1 April 2016 at 8pm Tickets: €15/€12

Written by composer and curator Simon O’Connor, and commissioned and presented by vocalist Michelle O’Rourke, Left Behind is a new collection of songs to mark the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising.Drawing on the experiences of women closely connected to the conflict, including the wives of prominent rebel leaders, O’Rourke and O’Connor have created a unique suite of compositions that offer an emotional, human perspective on a narrative that is too often told in baldly male heroic terms.

Beginning life as simple vocal/piano pieces, these songs have been transformed with the addition of O’Connor’s former bandmates from celebrated Dublin rock band The Jimmy Cake.

This small ensemble brings a volatile, dramatic energy to the retelling of the stories of Lillie Connolly, Grace and Muriel Gifford, Agnes Mallin and others. Find out more.

This performance supported by Donegal County Council and the Ireland 1916 Cetenary programme.

These events supported by Donegal County Council and the Ireland 1916 Cetenary programme.

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How to Sell Out every single show: Daithí Ramsay

I was working in our box office one evening when the visiting show’s stage manager approached.
How are tickets for tonight? he said.
Pretty good, about 270 now. I said.
Really? We’d a full house in Monaghan last night, he said.
What do they hold though? 200?
Yes about that, but we sold out.
Well we’ve sold more seats than that.
We sold out in Leitrim the night before as well.
What have they, about 120?
Yes, but we sold out.

We work in a sector where people are often very emotionally attached to how their work is received. Many of us are like that too: we work in the Arts because we love the Arts, we are passionate about the Arts. We must be, we’re clearly not here to get rich.

The Sold Out Show, along with the Standing Ovation, is the measure by which many judge how well their show is doing. The people have spoken and they think you’re great: there has been so much demand that we couldn’t accommodate them all. It’s a tough stand in the Arts these days and we have to take our victories where we get them. Companies are happy, programmers, administrators and marketeers can relax, it’s a job done well. We can’t do any more than fill every available seat.

There’s a problem with that that’s been nagging me for a while now though. The Sold out show is an emotional measure not a financial or numerical, it takes no account of varying capacities or competing realities and there is a clear presumption in it that there was a huge throng clamouring for tickets who have now had to go home disappointed that they didn’t get in to see the show. This is rarely the case, very rarely.

A photo of A Sold Out Show for the DMEP at An Grianán Theatre

A Sold Out Show for the DMEP at An Grianán Theatre, photo courtesy of the DMEP

Rather than celebrating what we are achieving we are too often snatching defeats from the jaws of victory. If it doesn’t sell out and the audience don’t leap to their feet then we haven’t done our job right: we aren’t a success. That’s clearly nonsense. A show should be judged on its own merits be it artistic or entertainment levels, is it a good show should be a judgement of just that: is it a good show?

The programming and marketing of it should be judged on whether or not the maximum number of people attended who could reasonably be expected based on realistic targets taking in many factors including previous sales of this type of show, day of the week, month of the year, competing attractions etc. We all have the data now, the only targets we should project or accept are those based on a clear analysis of the data. My greatest marketing triumph in a year may be getting 30% into a show that was only realistically expected to get 15% but who is going to recognise that apart from me? I could tell you but I doubt you’d be that impressed, but you know, a Sold Out Show …

I’m here to tell you though that it’s okay I’ve come up with a fool proof plan for everyone working in the Arts to be happy all the time: it’s clear what we need to do is take out seats so that we’ve less to sell. Less seats equals more sold out shows, and sold out shows is what makes everyone happy. Until that is they look at the bottom line of the financial spreadsheets, but sure how many do that?

I’m reminded of the theatre that told me that they had done away with postering as they felt it was no longer of benefit, except for one poster that they’d put up in the pub the actors drink. It’s lovely for actors to get full houses and standing ovations but it’s important to remember it’s an emotional measure and should have no place in judging how well we professionals have done our job. We have data for that.

The Henry girls playing to a Sold Out House at An Grianán Theatre. Photo by Living Witness Photography.

The Henry girls playing to a Sold Out House at An Grianán Theatre. Photo by Living Witness Photography.

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Rail Theatre’s Of Mice and Men: A Closer Look

Adapted by John Steinbeck from his novel of the same name, Of Mice and Men is a powerful portrait of the American spirit and a heartbreaking testament to the bonds of friendship.

Rail Theatre Company & Mulingar Arts Centre present John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, February 2016 at An Grianán Letterkenny

This large scale production comes from Rail Theatre Company and is directed by Sean Lynch from Mullingar Arts Centre,

Cast:
Murt Ennis as George
John ‘Banjo’ Quinn as Lennie
Shane Bardon as Slim
John Daly as Candy
Aidan Ennis as Curley
Jemma McNamee as Curley’s Wife
Ray Purcell as Whit
Adrian Dunne as The Boss
Paul McDermott as Carlson
Steve Hartland as Crooks.

Rail Theatre Company & Mulingar Arts Centre present John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, February 2016 at An Grianán Letterkenny

A fascinating story focusing on issues of isolation and prejudice, Of Mice and Men features two best friends who are in search of the American Dream. George and Lennie are drifters who take up work on a ranch in Salinas Valley. George is short and astute and Lennie is large and big-hearted, unaware of his strength.

Rail Theatre Company & Mulingar Arts Centre present John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, February 2016 at An Grianán Letterkenny

These two characters plan to stay in Salinas Valley until they have earned enough money to buy their own ranch. But a turn in events means that only a tragic outcome is possible for these two dreamers.

After the success Rail Theatre had at last year’s Electric Picnic festival in September and sell out performances in the Mullingar Art Centre we are pleased to welcome them to An Grianán for the first time.

Rail Theatre Co in association with Mullingar Arts Centre present
John Steinbeck’s
Of Mice and Men
Tues 23 Feb at 8pm, Wed 24 Feb at 10am and 1pm
Book now

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A look back at the original Kings

This Wednesday 17th & Thursday 18th February we welcome Livin’ Dred Theatre’s production of Jimmy Murphy’s emigration drama The Kings of the Kilburn High Road. But back in the summer of 2000, not long after An Grianán first opened its doors,  we were fortunate to host the original Red Kettle Theatre production of this play.

“it’s a very funny play. Every character has their own story to tell – the dreamers are still talking about coming home while the realists know that will not happen.” Charlie Bonner

Back then the Celtic Tiger was in full roar and the emigration of whole generations of young Irish people was seemingly becoming a thing of the past. How times have changed! And how relevant The Kings of the Kilburn High Road remains.

Our ticket sales rocketed when an elderly Australian nun rang in to Highland Radio to complain vociferously about the content and strong language. Audience member Laurence Blake takes up the story:

‘The last time I saw the show it was a very moving experience and not without some controversy. I found the show very real, relevant and upsetting for it brought to life many stories that I had heard from local workmen who had spent years working as navvies throughout the UK.

“It’s hard to believe that was 16 years ago and some commentators actually argued that these events never took place. I ended up on a “head to head” with a visiting nun on local radio who argued that a land of saints and scholars could never have produced such depraved, broken and drunken men. Sadly nothing could be further from the truth and the depiction as outlined in the play was very real and all too true to life.  But be sure to go and see the show for yourself and make up your own mind.

“In more recent times and again as a result of recession, hard times and unemployment, many of our skilled and unskilled workers were forced to emigrate once more. However most of these ended up not just in the UK but in far flung corners of the world and especially Australia. From what I hear from the returning Aussie workers, especially those on building sites and the mines–events and happenings as portrayed in the Kings of the Kilburn High Road are just as applicable today in such areas as Perth, Sydney, The Northern Territory or Queensland.”

Cast of The Kings of the Kilburn High Rd. JAP Phelim Drew GIT Malcom Adams SHAY Aurthur Riordain MAURTEEN Seamus O’Rourke JOE Charlie Bonner

Today’s Kings: GIT – Malcolm Adams, SHAY – Arthur Riordan, JAP – Phelim Drew, MAURTEEN – Seamus O’Rourke, JOE – Charlie Bonner

This revival features a fantastic cast including well known Donegal actor Charlie Bonner. Here he is talking about the play in the Donegal News: “They were a group of six…There is a lot of history between them so, when they start drinking, there’s singing, dancing and a lot of stories start to come out. There is also a lot of resentment there – it’s a very funny play. Every character has their own story to tell – the dreamers are still talking about coming home while the realists know that will not happen.”

Places like Kilburn may have changed out of all recognition as Jimmy Murphy describes in this article in the Irish Times: “they’re all gone now, the Kilburn High Road isn’t what it was and you’ll be hard pushed to see a Paddy these days, sober or drunk, the length and breadth of it. All that’s left are their stories, and for that we’re all the richer”.

Livin’ Dred Theatre present
The Kings of the Kilburn High Road
Wed 17 & Thur 18 Feb at 8pm Book now

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Our new Arts Magazine is here!

An Grianán Extra – A Wee Bit More is our new arts magazine.

Designed to compliment our standard events brochure, Extra offers a slightly more in depth look at some of our upcoming shows.

We have a profile on Donegal playwright Frank McGuinness written by Jessica Trainer, Literary Manager of the Abbey Theatre as well as a piece by theatre-artist-in-residence Guy Le Jeune talking about what he has planned for his residency.

Cover art for An Grianán Theatre's arts magazine by Laura Buchanan.

Cover art for An Grianán Theatre’s arts magazine by Laura Buchanan.

Our cover art is by artist Laura Buchanan and is inspired by photos from the 1916 Rising.

We also have a look back at the controversy surrounding The Kings of the Kilburn High Road when we first had it back in 2000.

Writer and local historian Kieran Kelly introduces his new play Beneath An Irish Sky which looks at how the events of the 1916 Rising affected Donegal. We will be holding a rehearsed reading of it as part of our short series events remembering 1916 which you can also read about in Extra.

Our director Patricia McBride offers her pick of the season as does well known writer and performer Little John Nee. What shows did they pick? Read the magazine now to find out!

You can read An Grianán Extra – A Wee Bit More online now. Hard copies are available at our box now.

Back cover art for An Grianán Theatre's arts magazine by Laura Buchanan.

Back cover art for An Grianán Theatre’s arts magazine by Laura Buchanan.

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After Miss Julie: A Closer Look

Rehearsals got under way in Belfast this week for Prime Cut’s latest production, After Miss Julie. Featuring an outstanding cast, this play comes to us in March and will appeal to fans of period drama and romantic intrigue.

After Miss Julie is Patrick Marber’s rework of August Strindberg’s 1888 iconic play Miss Julie. Originally Marber’s version was set within an English Manor during celebrations for the Labour Party victory in 1945. However Marber has worked closely with Prime Cut’s Artistic Director Emma Jordan and moved the action to Co, Fermanagh during the World War II VE-Day celebrations, placing the play within an Irish context.

After Miss Julie portrays the complex relationship between chauffeur John [Ciaran McMenamin] and the lady of the house Julie [Lisa Dwyer Hogg]. The ill-fated pair is caught up in a lustful tryst during VE-Day celebrations ultimately sealing their fate. Both characters’ moral foundations are repeatedly disrupted once John’s fiancée Christine, played by Pauline Hutton, is introduced to the love affair. What seems like a simple one-night affair develops into a complex chain of events that will fascinate audiences.

Patrick Marber's work includes Closer, which won three awards including the Laurence Oliver Award for Best New Play and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Foreign Play. His screenplay Notes of a Scandal won best screenplay at the British Independent Film Awards and the screenplay was also nominated for a BAFTA and an Academy Award.

Marber’s screenplay for Notes of a Scandal won best screenplay at the British Independent Film Awards and the screenplay was also nominated for a BAFTA and an Academy Award. His play Closer was adapted into a hit movie which was nominated for two Academy Awards.

Patrick Marber is an award winning playwright and screenwriter. He has won three awards for his stage play Closer including the Laurence Oliver Award for Best New Play and the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Foreign Play. His screenplay Notes of a Scandal won best screenplay at the British Independent Film Awards and was also nominated for a BAFTA and an Academy Award.

Emma Jordan is a critically acclaimed director with this production coming hot on the heels of her acclaimed production of Stacey Gregg’s Scorch. “I am so excited to be directing After Miss Julie – I can honestly say that I think Marber’s rework of this classic play is genius. The placing of the action of the play at such a time of seismic change in Ireland and Britain is truly inspiring – the breaking down of the class relationships between the characters is directly mirrored in a world radically changed by World War II and the imminent rise of Labour government”

The cast of three are all experienced established actors on both stage and film with exceptional stage performances seen from each throughout their careers.

Pauline Hutton, Ciaran McMenamin and Lisa Dwyer Hogg star in Patrick Marber's After Miss Julie at An Grianan Theatre March 2016

Pauline Hutton, Ciaran McMenamin and Lisa Dwyer Hogg star in Patrick Marber’s After Miss Julie at An Grianan Theatre March 2016

Ciaran McMenamin is best known for his film and television roles in such productions as Primeval, Pulling Moves and The Last Confession of Alexander Pearce. This is his first show with Prime Cut Productions. Lisa Dwyer Hogg is best known for her roles in theatre including The Importance of Being Earnest, Marnier and Heartbreak House but also for her TV roles in Waking the Dead, Casualty and the world acclaimed BBC drama The Fall. Pauline Hutton is best known for her career on the Stage for roles in such plays as Brendan At The Chelsea, Antigone and Macbeth, however Pauline has now starred alongside Lisa Dwyer Hogg in BBC Drama The Fall season 2 & 3, and also starred in Five Minutes Of Heaven, BAFTA winner for best drama Channel 4 films.

Saturday 26 March 2016 at 8pm
After Miss Julie
Prime Cut Productions
Tickets: €15/€12 Book now
NB: recommended ages 14+

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